How Showing Humility Can Advance Your Career

The Leadership Insiders network is an online community where the most thoughtful and influential people in business contribute answers to timely questions about careers and leadership. Today’s answer to the question, “How can you convince someone to be your mentor?” is written by Tuval Chomut, CEO of Clicktale.

Whether it’s Yoda to Luke Skywalker or Steve Jobs to Mark Zuckerberg, a mentor is essential to helping you succeed in your professional life. Sure, you can go it alone, but why not benefit from the years of experience and wisdom of others who have gone before you? At the same time, finding the right person and persuading them to be your mentor is a challenging prospect.

The Leadership Insiders network is an online community where the most thoughtful and influential people in business contribute answers to timely questions about careers and leadership. Today’s answer to the question, “How can you convince someone to be your mentor?” is written by Tuval Chomut, CEO of Clicktale.

Whether it’s Yoda to Luke Skywalker or Steve Jobs to Mark Zuckerberg, a mentor is essential to helping you succeed in your professional life. Sure, you can go it alone, but why not benefit from the years of experience and wisdom of others who have gone before you? At the same time, finding the right person and persuading them to be your mentor is a challenging prospect.

In the high-tech world, we’re always adapting to new technological advances. Over my career, many people both inside and outside of the company have come to me with entrepreneurial ideas, and I personally mentor about 10 people on a regular basis. These aren’t people who report directly to me, but if they are out-of-the-box thinkers, I love helping them unleash their potential. Curiosity is key, because it means the person won’t be rigid with their plans, and is more willing to adapt as necessary.

Be humble

Let’s face it, humility is not the top skill taught in business school. Businesspeople are taught to promote themselves, and make their voices heard and impact felt. Yet being humble doesn’t negate any of that—it actually conveys respect to the person who is giving up their valuable time to invest in you. As a mentor, I love to work with the people who don’t come with preconceived notions about the business and are flexible with new ways of doing things.

I wasn’t always this way. At the start of my career, I had a mentor who encouraged me to make big changes in my company. At first I was hesitant to take his advice. But he knew more about the business than I did, so eventually I decided to follow his guidance. In doing so, I found a way to propose solutions that made a big difference for the business.

Finding a mentor can be tough. Once you’ve succeeded, don’t forget the most valuable mantra of all (which is from Yoda himself): “Pass on what you have learned.”

[Source:-Fortune]